Where Art and Science Meet

“I set out to capture this image with two goals in mind. I first wanted to portray a plant biologist studying flowers, but I also wanted the subject to appear as if she was made of flowers, in order to illustrate the depth in which scientists can become enamored with their work, to the point that it comes to represent a part of who they are.” Zoë Rossman, senior, Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity
“I set out to capture this image with two goals in mind. I first wanted to portray a plant biologist studying flowers, but I also wanted the subject to appear as if she was made of flowers, in order to illustrate the depth in which scientists can become enamored with their work, to the point that it comes to represent a part of who they are.” Zoë Rossman, senior, Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity

Student photography exhibit at Buehler Alumni Center

The beauty of science is featured in photographs taken by undergraduates in Professor Terry Nathan’s Science and Society class, SAS 40. Students use photography in this Art/Science Fusion Course to explore the connections between those two worlds, and the results will be on display from June 1–23 at the Buehler Alumni Center. The public is welcome to the free opening reception on Thursday, June 2, from 3–5 p.m.

“I chose to photograph an insect in its environment in the arboretum while capturing the miniature landscape in which it lives. It is estimated that the insect group represents 80 percent of the world’s animal species. In spite of this, insects often go unnoticed due to their small size. I wanted to represent the insect’s world in a way that is artistic and scientific yet helps the viewer relate to something they don’t always notice.” Michelle Finch, senior, Managerial Economics
“I chose to photograph an insect in its environment in the arboretum while capturing the miniature landscape in which it lives. It is estimated that the insect group represents 80 percent of the world’s animal species. In spite of this, insects often go unnoticed due to their small size. I wanted to represent the insect’s world in a way that is artistic and scientific yet helps the viewer relate to something they don’t always notice.” Michelle Finch, senior, Managerial Economics
“To survive in harsh environments, plants have evolved into different forms, allowing them to adapt to different environments, creating incredible diversity. A great example would be carnivorous plants… Most people are familiar with the traps of carnivorous plant, but few understand or have seen their flowers.” Yiying Yang, freshman, Biological Sciences

“To survive in harsh environments, plants have evolved into different forms, allowing them to adapt to different environments, creating incredible diversity. A great example would be carnivorous plants… Most people are familiar with the traps of carnivorous plant, but few understand or have seen their flowers.” Yiying Yang, freshman, Biological Sciences