Accolades: April 2020

Bryan Jenkins wins academic leadership award from engineering society

Bryan Jenkins, chair of the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, is the recipient of a major award from the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE).

Bryan Jenkins
Bryan Jenkins

The 2020 James R. and Karen A. Gilley Academic Leadership Award honors ASABE members who are department chairs in the agricultural and biological engineering fields. Jenkins has been chair of the department since 2014 and is known as a strong advocate for recruiting new faculty and helping them succeed.

“Bryan has encouraged not only the overall success of faculty in research and teaching, but he has been an advocate for their increased experience beyond the home institution, encouraging their membership and active participation in highly relevant professional societies and promoting their achievements,” wrote his department colleagues in nominating him for the award.

He also has demonstrated leadership beyond the norm in his support of emeriti faculty, including his colleague and mentor, William Chancellor. Jenkins was instrumental in ensuring that Chancellor was recognized with the UC Davis medal before his passing.

Jenkins is particularly well-known nationally and internationally for his research and development of sustainable energy systems. He has been a leading figure in the biomass industry for decades. His vision to fully utilize residuals from forestry, agriculture and urban activities led to the creation of the California Biomass Collaborative, a statewide partnership of government, industry, environmental and educational institutions administered for the state by UC Davis.


LEAD21 program chair Mike O’Neill from the University of Connecticut, UC Davis nutrition professors Fawaz Haj and Nitin, UC Davis environmental toxicology professor Qi Zhang, and Lead 21 board chair Brian Kowalkowski from the College of Menominee Nation
From left to right, LEAD21 program chair Mike O’Neill from the University of Connecticut, UC Davis nutrition professors Fawaz Haj and Nitin Nitin, UC Davis environmental toxicology professor Qi Zhang, and Lead 21 board chair Brian Kowalkowski from the College of Menominee Nation

 

Three UC Davis faculty members graduate from national leadership program

Three UC Davis faculty members are among 90 individuals who recently completed LEAD21, a leadership development program drawing academic expertise from land-grant institutions across the nation. They include environmental toxicology professor Qi Zhang and nutrition professors Fawaz Haj and Nitin Nitin.

“Each and every one of the Class 15 alumni have been a pleasure to work with and we look forward to seeing the great things they will continue to do for our land-grant system,” said LEAD21 Program Director Rochelle Sapp, an extension leadership specialist at the University of Georgia.

Over the course of the past year, the class met regularly with their peers, both in-person and virtually, to enhance their capabilities. The primary purpose of LEAD21 is to develop leaders in land-grant institutions and their strategic partners who link research, academics and extension to lead more effectively, either in their current positions or future positions.


Entomology society honors three UC Davis faculty members

Three UC Davis faculty members were honored by the Pacific Branch, Entomological Society of America (PBESA) during its virtual meeting on April 20.

Mandatory coronavirus pandemic precautions led to canceling the 104th annual meeting, initially scheduled for April 19–22 in Spokane, Washington. The three UC Davis faculty members selected for the awards are:

  • Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology, is the recipient of PBESA's highest honor, the C. W. Woodworth Award. Kimsey was singled out for her 31 years of outstanding accomplishments in research, teaching, education, outreach and public service.
  • Robert Kimsey, forensic entomologist and associate adjunct professor, is recipient of the Distinction in Student Mentoring Award. Since 1990, Kimsey has taught and interacted with 7,000 students, including entomology, biology and animal biology majors.
  • Walter Leal, chemical ecologist and distinguished professor, is recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching. A former chair of the Department of Entomology, Leal employs the strategic use of digital technology in innovative ways.

Read more in a blog post by entomology writer Kathy Garvey here.

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