Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

Do Marine Protected Areas Work?

July 18, 2019
Study Identifies How to Verify Whether MPAs are Effective

Marine protected areas, or MPAs, are an increasingly common way of protecting marine ecosystems by prohibiting fishing in specific locations. However, many people remain skeptical that MPAs actually benefit fish populations, and there has not yet been a way to demonstrate whether or not they are effective. Until now.

Working Landscapes Can Support Diverse Bird Species

June 05, 2019
Forest Patches Are Opportunities to Conserve Wildlife

Privately owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. 

The research suggests that working with landowners to conserve or restore forests on working landscapes can help protect wildlife. In Costa Rica, working landscapes include forest patches, crops, pastures and small towns. 

Adapting to Change

May 28, 2019

Why do some tropical birds adapt better than others to changes in climate and land use? The answer will help conservationists protect wildlife as the Earth’s temperatures rise and rainforests give way to livestock production and other agricultural uses.

Tracking Change in Greenland

May 28, 2019

Scientists have known for decades that climate change would alter the rhythms of nature, but just how and when hasn’t been easy to predict. That’s why research, especially long-term research, is so important.

At a remote field site in Greenland, Professor Eric Post has studied changes in plant and animal communities for more than a quarter century. The UC Davis wildlife ecologist and his graduate students document how spring is arriving weeks earlier than it used to and what consequences that brings for herbivores like caribou and musk oxen.

UC Davis Professor Tim Caro has devoted his life to studying African wildlife

February 20, 2019

Tim Caro knew from a very young age what he wanted to make of his life.

“My mother gave me a copy of The Observer’s Book of Birdsat the age of three, and from that point onward I wanted to be a zoologist,” said the British-born UC Davis wildlife distinguished professor.

Wood ducks give students a wild experience

May 31, 2018

At UC Davis, wood ducks are known among students majoring in wildlife, fish and conservation biology as the wildlife model for an internship program run by Professor John Eadie. Each year, from 50 to 90 interns learn how to check nests, measure eggs, band birds, collect blood samples and conduct field research on waterfowl behavior, reproduction and survival.