Human & Animal Health

Working Landscapes Can Support Diverse Bird Species

June 05, 2019
Forest Patches Are Opportunities to Conserve Wildlife

Privately owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. 

The research suggests that working with landowners to conserve or restore forests on working landscapes can help protect wildlife. In Costa Rica, working landscapes include forest patches, crops, pastures and small towns. 

Quantifying Hope

June 03, 2019
Hope might seem like the business of philosophers and motivational speakers. But economists, too, are exploring the power of aspirations.

More than 800 million people in the world live in extreme poverty, surviving on less than $1.90 a day. Interventions usually focus on providing tangible resources, such as access to clean water, nutrition, health care, education and a viable income.

But new research from economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences highlights a psychological asset that could be equally important: hope.

Adapting to Change

May 28, 2019

Why do some tropical birds adapt better than others to changes in climate and land use? The answer will help conservationists protect wildlife as the Earth’s temperatures rise and rainforests give way to livestock production and other agricultural uses.

Decoding Depression

May 28, 2019
Team Works to Improve Young People’s Mental Health Across the Globe

Depression is a debilitating condition that affects millions of people around the world. It usually starts early in life and can limit educational, economic and social opportunities.

Early intervention can help doctors prevent and treat depression, but there isn’t a good screening tool, and most of what we know about depression is based on clinical trials in high-income countries where only a small percentage of young people live.

A Message From the Dean - May 2019

May 21, 2019
A commitment to human well-being is one of our core strengths

The College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is well known for its work in agriculture and the environment, but it also contributes important knowledge for improving the health and well-being of children, youth and families. Our researchers put into practice the idea that investment early in life prevents problems and social issues later. Human sciences are very much a part of our land-grant mission to serve the public.

An Evolutionary Rescue in Polluted Waters

May 02, 2019

How Genetics, Resources and a Long-Distant Relative Helped One Lucky Fish Species Adapt to Extreme Pollution

The combination of a big population, good genes and luck helps explain how a species of fish in Texas’ Houston Ship Channel was able to adapt to what normally would be lethal levels of toxins for most other species, according to a study to be published May 3 in the journal Science

Endangered White Abalone Program Yields Biggest Spawning Success Yet

April 26, 2019
Millions of Eggs Bring Program 1 Step Closer to Saving Species

The Bodega Marine Laboratory’s white abalone program has millions of new additions following its most successful spawning ever at the University of California, Davis, facility.

Three out of nine recently collected wild white abalone spawned last week, as did seven of 12 captive-bred white abalone. One wild female was particularly generous, producing 20.5 million eggs herself.

Most Microbes in Hummingbird Feeders Do Not Pose Health Hazard

March 06, 2019
Feeders or Flowers? Researchers Compare Microbes

Many people set up hummingbird feeders in their yards to nurture and watch these high-energy pollinators. But could the sugar water they provide be impacting these tiny feathered friends?

A study led by the University of California, Davis, is one of the first to address the potential for sugar water from hummingbird feeders to act as a vector for avian — or even zoonotic — pathogens. It found that the majority of microbes growing in feeders do not likely pose a significant health hazard to birds or humans.

UC Davis Professor Tim Caro has devoted his life to studying African wildlife

February 20, 2019

Tim Caro knew from a very young age what he wanted to make of his life.

“My mother gave me a copy of The Observer’s Book of Birdsat the age of three, and from that point onward I wanted to be a zoologist,” said the British-born UC Davis wildlife distinguished professor.