Human & Animal Health

Bats May Benefit From Wildfire

December 16, 2019
Fire Plays Important Role for Sierra Nevada Bats

Bats face many threats — from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that bats in the Sierra Nevada appear to be well-adapted to wildfire.

Can Salmon Eat Their Way Out of Climate Change?

December 16, 2019
Abundant Food Helps Offset Higher Temperatures for Fish. But There’s a Catch.

Warm waters are a threat to cold water fish like salmon and trout. But a study led by researchers at University of California, Davis suggests that habitats with abundant food sources may help buffer the effects of increasing water temperature.

DDT Linked to Higher Risk of Diabetes Among Asian Indian Immigrants to U.S.

November 20, 2019
Prior Exposure to Pollutant May Explain Higher Rate of Diabetes Among Indian Immigrants

Previous exposure to the pollutant DDT may contribute to the risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to the United States, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

Best of Frenemies: Unexpected Role of Social Networks in Ecology

November 04, 2019

Social networking, even between competing species, plays a much bigger role in ecology than anyone previously thought, according to three biologists at the University of California, Davis. 

“There’s mounting evidence that different species pay attention to each other in the wild, especially if they share predators,” said Mike Gil, postdoctoral researcher at UC Davis. “The theory of ecology has lagged behind.”

Genome-Edited Bull Passes on Hornless Trait to Calves

October 07, 2019
Study Sheds Light on Future of Genome Editing in Livestock

For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. This technology has been proposed as an alternative to dehorning, a common management practice performed to protect other cattle and human handlers from injuries.

Nutrition Programs Alone Aren’t Enough to Support Healthy Brain Development

September 18, 2019
Study Looks at Preventing Stunted Brains, Not Just Stunted Growth

A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Davis, shows that caregiving programs are five times more effective than nutrition programs in supporting smarter, not just taller, children in low- and middle-income countries.

In Major Milestone, Endangered White Abalone ‘Graduate’

September 13, 2019

By Ellen Caminiti

With tears in her eyes, Kristin Aquilino stood outside the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory in late August to give a commencement speech. She offered words of encouragement and thanks to a crowd of people who had supported the graduates throughout the years. The people stood hushed, clinging on every word, as they knew this was a momentous occasion that marked a future of hope. 

Working Landscapes Can Support Diverse Bird Species

June 05, 2019
Forest Patches Are Opportunities to Conserve Wildlife

Privately owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. 

The research suggests that working with landowners to conserve or restore forests on working landscapes can help protect wildlife. In Costa Rica, working landscapes include forest patches, crops, pastures and small towns. 

Quantifying Hope

June 03, 2019
Hope might seem like the business of philosophers and motivational speakers. But economists, too, are exploring the power of aspirations.

More than 800 million people in the world live in extreme poverty, surviving on less than $1.90 a day. Interventions usually focus on providing tangible resources, such as access to clean water, nutrition, health care, education and a viable income.

But new research from economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences highlights a psychological asset that could be equally important: hope.