Environment

Grazing and Riparian Restoration Are Compatible When You Put in the Work

November 18, 2020
Even Small Efforts to Keep Cows From Creeks Can Significantly Improve Riparian Health

With a little time and effort, rangeland managers can have a dramatic impact on the resilience of California’s riparian areas, which are important to the state’s human, environmental and economic well-being. Rangeland ecologists at the University of California, Davis, found that when ranchers invest even one week a year in practices that keep cows away from creeks — like herding, fencing and providing supplemental nutrition and water — they can improve riparian health by as much as 53 percent.

A Fixed-Effort Fishery More Sustainable for Economy and Environment

November 04, 2020
Study Considers Food Web, Extinction Cascades and Human Dynamics

For a truly sustainable fishery, more needs to be considered than just the abundance of the harvested species. Harvesting even abundant species can create indirect extinction cascades down the food web that can harm the long-term economic and ecological sustainability of a fishery. 

That is according to a study from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Science Advances. 

The Distance Local Energy Goes to Bring Power to the People

October 12, 2020
Study Comparing Energy Providers Finds Parallels to Local Foods Movement

When you go to the grocery store, you can look at an apple and know if it was grown in Chile, Washington or somewhere closer to you by a quick glance at its sticker. But consumers have largely been in the dark when it comes to energy, and how far it has traveled to reach them. 

Natural Capital a Missing Piece in Climate Policy

September 28, 2020
Accounting for the Unique and Long-Term Impacts of Climate Change

Clean air, clean water and a functioning ecosystem are considered priceless. Yet the economic value of nature remains elusive in cost-benefit analysis of climate policy regulations and greenhouse-gas-reduction efforts.

Wildfire on the Rise Since 1984 in Northern California’s Coastal Ranges

September 17, 2020
From Berryessa to Klamath Mountains, High-Severity Burns Quadrupled During Warm Drought

High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, that associates climate trends with wildfire.

Cacti and Other Iconic Desert Plants Threatened by Solar Development

July 20, 2020
Native Desert Plants Important to Indigenous Cultures Especially Vulnerable

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them. 

But large solar energy facilities are one threat that cacti weren’t built to withstand, according to a study by the University of California, Davis. 

Finding Hope in Rangeland Restoration

June 26, 2020

Spring is the perfect season to explore rangeland ecology in California. The grasslands are green, the skies are blue, and bright yellow monkey flowers dance in the breeze. Even metaphorically, spring is a good fit. Rangeland restoration brings new life.

Roadkill Declines as COVID-19 Continues

June 25, 2020
Thousands of Large Animals Spared Under Shelter in Place, Finds Report on Three States

Fewer wild animals, including threatened mountain lions, are becoming roadkill during shelter-in-place orders, finds a study on three states from the University of California, Davis.

Using traffic and collision data collected from California, Idaho and Maine, the researchers found that wildlife-vehicle conflict has declined by 21-56 percent from early March to mid-April, following government stay-at-home orders.