Environment

Thinning Forests, Prescribed Fire Before Drought Reduced Tree Loss

May 29, 2019
Treatments May Reduce Loss in Future Droughts and Bark Beetle Epidemics

Thinning forests and conducting prescribed burns may help preserve trees in future droughts and bark beetle epidemics expected under climate change, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis.

Tracking Change in Greenland

May 28, 2019

Scientists have known for decades that climate change would alter the rhythms of nature, but just how and when hasn’t been easy to predict. That’s why research, especially long-term research, is so important.

At a remote field site in Greenland, Professor Eric Post has studied changes in plant and animal communities for more than a quarter century. The UC Davis wildlife ecologist and his graduate students document how spring is arriving weeks earlier than it used to and what consequences that brings for herbivores like caribou and musk oxen.

Lassen Is UC Davis’ Newest Natural Reserve

May 17, 2019
Landscape of Volcanoes, Forests Offers Unique Research and Outreach Opportunities

With a terrain covering volcanoes, steaming fumaroles and forestlands, the Lassen Field Station became the newest addition to the University of California, Davis’ Natural Reserve System today (May 16), following approval by the UC Board of Regents.

Predicting Heat Waves? Look Half a World Away

May 01, 2019
When Thunderstorms Brew Over the Tropics, California Heat Wave Soon to Follow

When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100 F in four to 16 days, according to a collaborative research team from the University of California, Davis, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Climate Center in Busan, South Korea. 

Coast Redwood and Giant Sequoia Mega-Genomes Sequenced

April 23, 2019
Sequencing Brings Modern Tools to Redwood Conservation Efforts

Scientists have successfully sequenced the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes, completing the first major milestone of a five-year project to develop the tools necessary to study these forests’ genomic diversity. The research partners, composed of the University of California, Davis, Johns Hopkins University and the Save the Redwoods League, are making the data publicly available today.   

Clams and Water Pumping Explain Phytoplankton Decline in San Francisco Estuary

April 09, 2019
Timing Could Make a Difference to Ease the Double Punch of Clams and Pumps

A combination of invasive clams and water pumping explains the drastic suppression of phytoplankton in the San Francisco Estuary, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.  

Previous studies linked fish declines in the estuary in part to a limited supply of phytoplankton. These tiny microscopic algae make up the base of the food web: Fish eat zooplankton, which eat phytoplankton.  

Tweets Tell Scientists How Quickly We Normalize Unusual Weather

February 25, 2019
Study: ‘Remarkable’ Weather Becomes Normal Within a Few Years

What kinds of weather do people find remarkable, when does that change, and what does that say about the public’s perception of climate change? A study led by the University of California, Davis, examined those questions through the lens of more than 2 billion U.S. Twitter posts.  

$4.7M to Study Storing Greenhouse Gases in Soil

January 16, 2019
Muir Institute Leads UC Project to Find Shovel-Ready Solutions for Carbon Sequestration

California leads the nation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but reductions alone will not be enough to reach the targets set by the 2015 Paris climate agreement. To do that, greenhouses gases like carbon dioxide will need to be removed from the atmosphere on a monumental scale.

How Climate Change Is Affecting Small Sierra Nevada Lakes

December 19, 2018
Spring Snowpack a Bigger Predictor of Lake Warming Than Air Temperature

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, are taking the temperature — and other measurements — of lakes of all sizes and shapes throughout the mountains of California to see how climate change is affecting them and what, perhaps, can be done about it.

Report: Changing manure management would significantly reduce dairy methane emissions


October 18, 2018

New research published in the Journal of Dairy Science finds that changing the way manure is stored and handled is key to meeting California’s 40 percent dairy manure methane reduction goal and combating climate change. 

With financial support from Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and cooperation from the Dairy Cares coalition, leading scientists worked together to produce the most thorough, detailed measurements of “whole-dairy” methane emissions in California to date.