Agriculture

Growing, Crafting, Selling: Students Learn the Art of Olive Oil Production

 

Olio Novello Festival

Saturday, November 18
Noon to 3 p.m.
UC Davis Olive Center at the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science

Register online

 

Includes:

-Free tastings of the 2023 limited edition Olio Novello extra virgin olive oil

-“Grow Olive Trees in your Garden: Basics of Planting and Care,” a free class with tips on how to grow olive trees at home

Heat Waves Negatively Impact Bird Reproduction in Agriculture

Bird populations are in rapid decline across North America. While climate change is just one of the many factors influencing North American birds, its effects are significant and can interact with other stressors, such as habitat loss. A team of University of California, Davis, researchers found that the effects of extreme temperatures on avian reproduction can vary depending on the type of environment that birds call home.

Parasitic Weeds Threaten Tomato Plants on California Farms

At first glance, Orobanche ramosa looks like an interesting blossoming plant, one that could add a unique flair to flower arrangements. But it’s a parasitic weed that attaches to roots, sucks out nutrients and is threatening California’s lucrative $1.5 billion processing tomato industry.

Chardonnay Marc: A ‘Trifecta’ of Health, Taste and Sustainability

UC Davis researchers are providing more insight into how grape skins and seeds, which usually go to waste during the making of chardonnay wine, may be a valuable and healthful ingredient in new food products.

A review paper published by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry outlines how chardonnay marc can serve as a model for developing plant-based natural product food ingredients, and perhaps make upcycling agricultural byproducts relevant to other post-harvest processing scenarios.

Historical Artwork with Agricultural Motifs on Display at the Robert Mondavi Institute Complex

Peaches, grapes, tomatoes and olives – some of California’s specialty crops that have been the subject of numerous research projects at UC Davis are also a prominent feature in a colorful art display at the home of the Department of Food Science and Technology.

A large vinyl display was recently unveiled in the Robert Mondavi Institute (RMI) complex. It was created using images of three historical batik cloth panels that depict California agricultural motifs.

UC Davis Student Plant Breeders Cultivating Improved Varieties of Asian Celtuce

Researchers at UC Davis are working to develop new and improved varieties of celtuce, a leafy green vegetable that plays an important role in Asian cuisine. The Student Collaborative Organic Plant Breeding Education (SCOPE) project, which works with local organic growers on improving crop varieties, is analyzing the traits of celtuce to improve seed availability for small scale farmers.

UC Davis Researchers Collaborating on Project to Help Farmers Improve Fertilization and Irrigation Practices

UC Davis researchers are collaborating with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) and UC Agriculture and Natural Resources on a project to help farmers in the state improve their fertilization and irrigation practices. CDFA received $2 million from the USDA for a three-year project that includes sending seven UC Cooperative Extension personnel to the San Joaquin Valley to perform education and demonstration projects, provide on-farm consultation and conduct outreach activities to promote locally appropriate best practices.

Bringing Out the Best in Wild Birds on Farms

A supportive environment can bring out the best in an individual — even for a bird. 

After an E.coli outbreak in 2006 devastated the spinach industry, farmers were pressured to remove natural habitat to keep wildlife — and the foodborne pathogens they can sometimes carry — from visiting crops. A study published today from the University of California, Davis, shows that farms with surrounding natural habitat experience the most benefits from birds, including less crop damage and lower food-safety risks.