Research

Grasslands More Reliable Carbon Sink Than Trees

July 11, 2018
In Wildfire-Prone California, Grasslands a Less Vulnerable Carbon Offset Than Forests

Forests have long served as a critical carbon sink, consuming about a quarter of the carbon dioxide pollution produced by humans worldwide. But decades of fire suppression, warming temperatures and drought have increased wildfire risks — turning California’s forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources.

New insight into why Pierce’s disease is so deadly to grapevines

June 14, 2018
Research could help diagnose disease early and increase plant health

Scientists are gaining a better understanding of Pierce’s disease and how it affects grapevines. The disease, which annually costs California more than $100 million, comes from a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa. While the bacterium has been present in the state for more than 100 years, Pierce’s disease became a more serious threat to agriculture with the arrival of the glassy-winged sharpshooter insect, which can carry the bacterium from plant to plant.

Even better for baby

June 13, 2018
Bifidobacteria supplement colonizes gut of breastfed infants

Supplementing breastfed infants with activated Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) bacteria had a positive impact on babies’ gut microbes for up to a year, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Evolve BioSystems Inc.

Can seaweed cut methane emissions on dairies?

May 24, 2018

Expert sees dramatic reduction when cows consume seaweed supplement

Seaweed may be the super food dairy cattle need to reduce the amount of methane they burp into the atmosphere. Early results from novel research at the University of California, Davis, indicate that just a touch of the ocean algae in cattle feed could dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions from California’s 1.8 million dairy cows.

Crucial lettuce gene discovery

March 30, 2016

Gene affects germination and flowering; big implications for climate change adaptation

Like most annuals, lettuce plants live out their lives in quiet, three-act dramas that follow the seasons. Seed dormancy gives way to germination; the young plant emerges and grows; and finally in the climax of flowering, a new generation of seeds is produced. It’s remarkably predictable, but the genetics that coordinates these changes with environmental cues has not been well understood.

$6.9 M To Fund Milk Research

November 25, 2014

New funding will help researchers study the health-boosting compounds in cow’s milk.

The research team is hopeful that findings from these studies of milk-based compounds can be rapidly developed into products capable of enhancing human health.

After spending more than a decade decoding breast milk’s important health-promoting constituents, a team of researchers in the Foods for Health Institute at the University of California, Davis, is now doing the same for cow’s milk, with potential benefits both for human health and the U.S. dairy industry.

Study: Antimicrobial May Damage Liver

November 18, 2014

A common antimicrobial found in common soaps may cause liver damage and raise cancer risk.

Long-term exposure to triclosan, an antimicrobial agent commonly found in a broad array of soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and other consumer products, may have potentially serious health consequences, reports a research team including a UC Davis scientist.