Student Farm

UC Davis Student Plant Breeders Cultivating Improved Varieties of Asian Celtuce

Researchers at UC Davis are working to develop new and improved varieties of celtuce, a leafy green vegetable that plays an important role in Asian cuisine. The Student Collaborative Organic Plant Breeding Education (SCOPE) project, which works with local organic growers on improving crop varieties, is analyzing the traits of celtuce to improve seed availability for small scale farmers.

Project explores Asian food heritage and farming footprint

Article originally published by UC Davis College of Letters and Sciences.

The 6 million people of Asian and Pacific Islander descent in California — 15% of the population — influence many aspects of the state’s culture. Nowhere is that more apparent than in food. But while Asian cuisine plays an outsized role in California, growers face obstacles in bringing the ingredients to the table.

Student Farm keeps working to feed the community

A half dozen people wear orange plastic gloves and keep their distance from each other as they harvest lettuce, kale, beets and other crops at the UC Davis Student Farm. Their bounty will help feed the Davis community in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Like everyone else, we’re trying to respond as best we can in these uncertain times,” says Katharina Ullmann, Student Farm director, taking a break from the day’s harvest.  

Student Farm

The Student Farm is a community where students work to create, maintain, and explore sustainable food systems. At the farm, students grow in many ways, learning from seasoned field-based educators, from their peers and from themselves. They come to understand sustainability through the soils, crops, climate and community in which they work. In the process, they gain the systems-based thinking and doing skills needed to make a positive difference in today’s world.

Life on the UC Davis Student Farm

The UC Davis Student Farm is one of the cornerstone examples of experiential learning of sustainable agriculture and food systems in Davis. The Student Farm, through various internships, volunteer opportunities, and employment opportunities allows students to gain knowledge through experiential learning by working on a sustainable organic farm. This video, produced by students, gives us a lens into what happens on the farm.

Support for Students

Alumna and Davis Farmers Market Cookbook author Ann Evans champions CA&ES Dean’s Circle

Each year, hundreds of friends and alumni of the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences contribute more than $100,000 to support the CA&ES Dean’s Circle Fund, a special program that provides essential student support.

Awards and Honors: Mark Van Horn selected as on-farm educator

Student Farm director receives namesake award from Sustainable Agriculture Education Association

Mark Van Horn, director of the UC Davis Student Farm, was awarded the inaugural Mark Van Horn On-Farm Educator Award, established by the Sustainable Agriculture Education Association and presented during the association’s recent biennial conference. 

 

Students Breeding a Better Organic Popper Pepper

Students practicing what they learn, breeding a new pepper

What do you get when you cross a jalapeño pepper with a bell pepper?

An ingenious group of UC Davis students are proving you can create a jumbo, organic, jalapeño “popper,” perfect for stuffing with rice, vegetables, protein and cheese. For the last four years, the young scientists have been making crosses and developing a new variety of pepper with the taste and texture of a jalapeño, an extra-large cavity, and the right traits to thrive on organic farms.