Wine may have more alcohol than on label

Wine bottles in the historic collection of the Dept. of Viticulture and Enology at UC Davis. (photo: Ann Filmer / UC Davis)
Wine bottles in the historic collection of the Dept. of Viticulture and Enology at UC Davis. (photo: Ann Filmer / UC Davis)

Prof. Julian Alston estimates 10 percent more alcohol in wine than 20 years ago

February 24, 2014
(from the Northern Star, Australia)

The amount of alcohol in wine has risen in the past 20 years, by about 10 percent, according to Professor Julian Alston, director of the RMI Center for Wine Economicsat UC Davis.

 

 
Professor Julian Alston, UC Davis.

Alston said the alcohol content of both red and white wines had been rising steadily for two decades. “What we think is happening is that consumers are demanding wines with stronger flavours and higher sugar content of grapes,” he said.

“So the higher alcohol is essentially a nuisance by-product of commercial decisions to produce fuller flavours in wine to suit consumers.”

(Read the full article, Feb. 5, 2014, in the Northern Star, Australian Regional Media.)

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