Land, Air and Water Resources

Wildfire on the Rise Since 1984 in Northern California’s Coastal Ranges

September 17, 2020
From Berryessa to Klamath Mountains, High-Severity Burns Quadrupled During Warm Drought

High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, that associates climate trends with wildfire.

Irrigation expert Isaya Kisekka named recipient of the IA 2020 Excellence in Education Award

July 24, 2020

Isaya Kisekka, associate professor in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources and in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, is the recipient of the 2020 Excellence in Education Award from the Irrigation Association (IA). The award recognizes a person who teaches irrigation, water management and/or water conservation at a two- or four-year institution.

Cacti and Other Iconic Desert Plants Threatened by Solar Development

July 20, 2020
Native Desert Plants Important to Indigenous Cultures Especially Vulnerable

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them. 

But large solar energy facilities are one threat that cacti weren’t built to withstand, according to a study by the University of California, Davis. 

Atmospheric Scientist Named UC Davis Teaching Prize Winner

March 12, 2020
Award Recognizes Exemplary Teaching, Research and Service

Professor Kyaw Tha Paw U carries a cheat sheet of sorts to class, with thumbnail photos and names of his students. Across a sea of faces, this personal class roster helps him learn each of their names, an effort he takes very seriously.

“He learned everyone’s names,” a student wrote on a class evaluation. “In doing so, I knew he could call on me at any time, which caused me to always pay attention. Amazing professor!”

UC Davis atmospheric scientist Da Yang named a 2019 Packard Fellow

October 15, 2019

Da Yang, a UC Davis atmospheric scientist who studies the physics of intense rainstorms like hurricanes and their relationship to the Earth’s climate, has been awarded a 2019 Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

Yang is among 22 early-career scientists and engineers nationwide to receive the prestigious award this year. Each will be awarded $875,000 over five years to pursue their research. He is the first recipient of the Packard Fellowship in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis.

20 Overlooked Benefits of Distributed Solar Energy

July 12, 2019
Study Outlines Advantages of Solar on Rooftops, Other Developed Areas

A study released today provides the most complete list yet of the advantages of solar energy — from carbon sequestration to improvements for pollinator habitat. The paper offers a new framework for analyzing solar projects to better understand the full suite of benefits.

Maximizing Use of Water Stored in Soil Could Result in Savings for Farmers

May 14, 2019
Study Finds a Climate-Smart Strategy for California Agriculture

As California faces more frequent and severe droughts, agriculture, which relies on irrigation from surface water and groundwater, could become expensive and unsustainable. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, looked at using a “free” resource — rain water stored in the soil — and found that optimizing its use could go a long way to help meet demand for five California perennial crops. Their findings appear in the journal Environmental Research Letters.