Animal Science

Human Actions Impact Wild Salmon’s Ability to Evolve

December 04, 2018
Spring-Run Chinook’s Decline and Loss Connected to Specific Gene Variation

Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential.

UC Davis to lead national cow genomics effort

June 21, 2018
USDA-funded project aims to uncover important genetic traits in cattle

The cattle industry is the largest agricultural commodity in the United States, generating more than $100 billion in farm cash receipts in 2016. Despite cattle’s economic importance, scientists still have a long way to go to fully understand mechanisms that govern important genetic traits in the animals such as growth and disease resistance.

Closing the loop on sustainable aquaculture

May 29, 2018

Inside the world’s first caviar farm that uses fish waste to grow vegetables

On a farm just outside of Sacramento, hundreds of prehistoric-looking fish swim around in 50-foot diameter tanks. These are white sturgeon, the largest freshwater fish in North America. They’ve been around since dinosaurs, can grow more than 7 feet long and lay hundreds of thousands of eggs at a time. The roe of these sturgeon are harvested for a boutique food producer regally named Tsar Nicoulai Caviar.

Can seaweed cut methane emissions on dairies?

May 24, 2018

Expert sees dramatic reduction when cows consume seaweed supplement

Seaweed may be the super food dairy cattle need to reduce the amount of methane they burp into the atmosphere. Early results from novel research at the University of California, Davis, indicate that just a touch of the ocean algae in cattle feed could dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions from California’s 1.8 million dairy cows.

Can we better prepare hens for cage-free living?

April 19, 2018

UC Davis animal welfare experts test ways to reduce broken bones

Consumers are clamoring for cage-free eggs, and producers are scrambling to meet the demand.

In 2017, nearly 16 percent of all hens in the U.S. were in cage-free production. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about 75 percent of all laying hens will need to be cage free by 2026 to meet market demand.