Animal Science

UC Davis Research Seeks to Unlock Mule Health Through Pictures, Video

Mules are stoic working animals. They can be sick or in pain and by the time signs of illness are obvious, it could be too late for owners and veterinarians to intervene.

But new research out of University of California, Davis, could unlock that mystery by decoding whether body posture and facial expressions such as flaring nostrils and ear movement can be clues to something more.  

Animal Science, Equestrian Team Research Could Lead to Happier, Healthier Horses

A unique research collaboration involving animal science students, the UC Davis Intercollegiate Equestrian Team and more than 700 hours of video could help enrich the lives of stabled horses.

The subjects had names like Rogue, Sparky, Bella and Fargo and the research involved tools such as a Beethoven symphony, shatter-proof mirrors, slow feeding forage balls and giant rubber jolly balls.

Fall Is Best Time to Clean Nest Boxes for Barn Owls

When it comes to American barn owls, forget spring cleaning. 

The best time of year to clean out nest boxes to ready them for breeding pairs is the fall months of September through November, according to research out of the University of California, Davis, that analyzed nearly a century of banding and other records. 

Ultrasounds for Abalone

The world’s abalone are threatened, endangered or otherwise vulnerable in nearly every corner of the planet. While captive breeding efforts are underway for some species, these giant sea snails are notoriously difficult to spawn. If only we could wave a magic wand to know when abalone are ready to reproduce, without even touching them. 

Meet Cosmo, a Bull Calf Designed to Produce 75% Male Offspring

Scientists Use CRISPR Technology to Insert Sex-Determining Gene

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he’ll produce more male offspring. The research was presented in a poster today (July 23) at the American Society of Animal Science meeting.

Note to Public: Rural UC Davis ‘Isn’t a Park’

During the coronavirus pandemic, the rural parts of the UC Davis campus have seen an influx of visitors seeking alternative recreation spots close to home — sometimes too many visitors and sometimes with adverse consequences.

Officials say habitat is being damaged, agricultural research threatened and wildlife impacted in the Putah Creek Riparian Reserve and other areas of south and west campus.

CRISPR a Tool for Conservation, Not Just Gene Editing

Scientists Use CRISPR to Rapidly Identify Endangered Delta Smelt and Its Look-Alikes

The gene-editing technology CRISPR has been used for a variety of agricultural and public health purposes — from growing disease-resistant crops to, more recently, a diagnostic test for the virus that causes COVID-19.

Genome-Edited Bull Passes on Hornless Trait to Calves

Study Sheds Light on Future of Genome Editing in Livestock

For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. This technology has been proposed as an alternative to dehorning, a common management practice performed to protect other cattle and human handlers from injuries.