Climate Change

Poor Swelter as Urban Areas of U.S. Southwest Get Hotter

February 19, 2021
Unequal Burden Also for Latino Communities

Acres of asphalt parking lots, unshaded roads, dense apartment complexes and neighborhoods with few parks have taken their toll on the poor. As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit — on average — than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions, University of California, Davis, researchers have found in a new analysis. 

Migratory Birds Track Climate Across the Year

February 18, 2021

As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range. The work is published Feb. 17 in Ecology Letters.

Cacti and Other Iconic Desert Plants Threatened by Solar Development

July 20, 2020
Native Desert Plants Important to Indigenous Cultures Especially Vulnerable

With their tough skins, pointy armor and legendary stamina, cacti are made to defend themselves from whatever nature throws at them. 

But large solar energy facilities are one threat that cacti weren’t built to withstand, according to a study by the University of California, Davis. 

As Americans Shelter in Place, Traffic, Emissions and Fuel-Tax Revenues Decline Dramatically

May 01, 2020
COVID-19 Mitigation Efforts Could Put U.S. on Track to Meet Paris Climate Accord Goals

Americans drove drastically less, saved millions of metric tons of greenhouse gases, and, in some states, lost millions in fuel-tax revenue since COVID-19 mitigation efforts took effect in early March. That is according to the latest special report from the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Davis.

Concrete Solutions That Lower Both Emissions and Air Pollution

March 23, 2020
Air Quality and Climate Change Intertwine in Unexpected Ways. A Concrete Example.

 

Sometimes, fixing one problem can create another.

Concrete production contributes 8 percent of global greenhouse gases, and demand continues to rise as populations and incomes grow. Yet some commonly discussed strategies to reduce the sector’s global GHG emissions could, under some scenarios, increase local air pollution and related health damages, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.